B.A. (Honours) in Media, English & Culture (Coming Soon)

Code: N/A

Level: 8

Credits: 240 ECTS

Points: N/A

Duration: 4 Years

*This programme is currently awaiting QQI Validation with the aim of enrolling students for September 2022 through CAO. If you wish to be contacted/kept up to date with this programme please fill out the Expression of Interest form above.

B.A. (Honours) in Media, English and Culture

The BA (Hons) in Media, English and Culture is an exciting, innovative 4-year undergraduate programme that prepares you for future challenges in an information-rich society. The programme explores the power of media, literature and culture to shape our identities, everyday lives and the world in which we live. You will study a range of popular media and cultural forms including social media, television, film, documentary, and music, and read the most compelling works of modern and contemporary literature. You will also have option to choose modules in creative writing and drama, and to work on traditional and digital creative projects. The programme fosters the accumulation of knowledge and the acquisition of a diverse set of skills, essential to helping you be an independent thinker, and empowering you to shape your future, to develop new career prospects and have the ability to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing modern workplace.

Key Features of the Programme

  • Provides a holistic approach to the study of Media, English and Culture to equip students for careers in dynamic industries.
  • Develops crucial skills of media literacy and socially-engaged awareness of the digital landscape.
  • Strong emphasis on employability and graduate progression throughout the programme with modules providing vital sector-specific soft skills such as project planning, community engagement practices, new media engagement, in-person collaboration, presentation and communication skills.
  • Study innovative, contemporary topics ranging from Digital Storytelling and Curating Creative Events to Gothic Fiction and Social Media.
  • The programme can be tailored to suit individual needs and particular areas of interest within the individual fields of Media, English and Culture.
  • Unique opportunity for students to study Music in this area with no prior experience required.
  • The option to study creative subjects such as Creative Writing, Drama, Community Arts, Curating Creative Arts, Digital Storytelling, and Creativity and Social Media.
  • Some Creative subjects will be taught in VISUAL, a world class arts centre and theatre based on campus.
  • The programme syllabus meets teaching council requirements for English, enabling graduates to progress to a Professional Masters in Education.

Leaving Certificate Applicants:

Leaving Certificate applicants must have H5 or above in two higher level subjects plus a minimum of four O6s. Applicants must have a minimum H6 in Higher Leaving Cert English or equivalent.

Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme (L.C.V.P. Link Modules): Carlow College awards points for results in Leaving Certificate Vocational Programme Link Modules in place of a Leaving Certificate subject as follows: LCVP Grade Points – Distinction 66, Merit 46, Pass 28.

QQI-FET Applicants:

The minimum entry requirements for Further Education Applicants are a full QQI/FE Award at Level 5 or 6 in a ‘linked’ programme with a minimum FE grade equivalent of 243 CAO points. Places are limited and will be allocated based on the applicant’s score only. The best eight modules in a single award will be used for the calculation of points. When more than one applicant has the same score, applicants will be ranked by the CAO on a random basis. A full Award may be accumulated over more than one academic year.

Language Proficiency Requirements

Minimum language proficiency requirements Applicants whose first language is not English must be able to provide evidence that their spoken and written level of English is adequate for successful participation in the programme. The relevant certified documentation to support this shall be provided as part of the application process. In all cases the English language certification must have been obtained within two years prior to the application to Carlow College. For proficiency certification recognised by the College see the English Language Requirements for Admission to Carlow College, St. Patrick’s.

Mathematical Proficiency Requirements

Minimum mathematical proficiency requirements Mathematics is not a requirement for entry onto this programme.

Minimum criteria for passing the access interview (if applicable) Mature Learner Applications:

Mature learner applicants are assessed on the basis of a completed application form, written assessment and interview. This process has regard to 56 the applicant’s previous education, work and life experience and demonstration of their ability and competence to undertake the course. Positive ratings will only be given to applicants who achieve at least the minimum programme threshold requirement on the combined application process and demonstrate that he/she has a reasonable chance of completing a programme of study. At present Carlow College does not apply a quota to the numbers of mature applicant places available on its programmes (see the Admission Guidelines and Procedures for Mature Learner Applicants).

Structure

Each year every student on the B.A. (Honours) in English, Media and Culture must accumulate 60 credits.

Year 1

Year 1 comprises 12 core mandatory 5 credit modules for a total of 60 credits.

Media and Society

Cultural Studies

Introduction to Literature

Western Art Music 1

Virtues of Poetry

Academic and Digital Skills

Cinema and Modern Life

Irish Writing 1960 – 1990

Introduction to Drama and Theatre

Western Art Music 2

World Music

Media and Culture Seminar

Year 2

In Year 2 students will complete 9 mandatory core modules and 3 elective modules for a total of 12 modules at 60 credits.

Core Modules

Documentary across Media

Cultivating a Sociological Imagination

Critical Approaches to Literature

Popular Music and Culture

Community Arts: Theory and Practice

Media Arts

Television and the Everyday

Contemporary Irish Writing

Elective Modules

Creative Writing: Poetry

Romantic Poetry

Theatre of the European Renaissance

General Ethics: Guiding Rules

Drama and Performance 1

American Literature 1

General Ethics: the Good Life

Year 3

In Year 3 you will complete 6 mandatory core modules and choose 6 others from a wide range of elective modules for a total of 60 credits.

Core Modules

Media and Communications

Music and Visual Cultures

Digital Storytelling

Understanding Social Media

Women make Music

Research methods

Elective Modules

Intro to Curating Creative Events

Drama and Performance 2

Critical Theory 1

American Literature 2

Gothic Fiction

Literature and Revolution in Ireland

The Politics of Irish Literature 1798 – 1898

Existentialism: Philosophy and Literature

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry

Signs and Meaning in Cinema

Musical Theatre

Cyber-psychology

Critical Theory 2

Modernism and Modernity

Literature of the Victorian Age

Gender and Sexuality in Post-1960s Irish Culture

Literature and the Troubles

Year 4

In Year 4 you will choose 9 modules from a range of elective modules and complete a research dissertation or a media project or a creative project for a total of 60 credits.

Core Modules

Dissertation / Media Project / Creative Project

Elective Modules

Contemporary Cinema

Social Movements, Activism & Social Change

Postmodern Literature

Post-War British and American Poetry

Literature and Revolution in Ireland

The Politics of Irish Literature 1798 – 1898

Musical Theatre

Cyber-psychology

Philosophy, Society and Literature

Media Archaeology and the Digital Landscape

Modern Drama in performance

Postcolonial Writing

Gender and Sexuality in Post-1960s Irish Culture

Literature and the Troubles

Module Descriptors

Year 1

Semester 1

Academic and Digital Skills

This module aims to introduce learners to the expectations and conventions of a higher education learning environment and to enhance their personal effectiveness as learners. Through the development of key academic and digital skills, an independent and reflective approach to learning is encouraged which will enable the learner to manage confidently their academic coursework at degree level.

Cultural Studies

This module is a core module which develops and lay the ground for learners in the area of media and culture. The module explores how we make meaning of our everyday world and what we do to express meaning of our world (for example through film, novels, tv series, podcasts, fashion even texting). It also studies the habits and practices we form. In this way cultural studies examines cultural practices that define who we are and how we engage with the world we are in as both an individual and as a member of a group or society.

Introduction to Literature

This module aims to provide learners with the ability to read literature in context. Learners are provided with a foundation for understanding the canon and canonicity, genre, form, period and literary history that they will encounter over the duration of their studies in English.

Media and Society

This module contextualises media history and lays the theoretical ground to understand technological invention, communication and their role within political/social contexts in society. Paying particular attention to the 19th century and early 20th century this module explores media evolution within a wider discussion of modernity.

The Virtues of Poetry

This module aims to inspire confidence in learners that when they encounter poems that they will be able to read them, comprehend them, and analyse them. This course aims to produce advocates of poetry in the public and educational domain, based on their understanding of the many traditions of poetry, and through their mastery of the language used to articulate the complex combination of elements that are held in tension in great poetry.

Western Art Music from the Late Baroque to Romantic Era

This module provides a broad introduction to Western Art Music of the late Baroque, Classical and Romantic eras. This is done primarily through critical listening and theoretical discussion of composers such as J.S. Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. On completion, learners will have demonstrated an ability to research and discuss these repertories from historical and stylistic perspectives.

Semester 2

Cinema and Modern Life

This module aims to give a grounding in the social and cultural context of the emergence of cinema. This module will engage in wider media concepts and debates around audience, industrialization of culture and the theoretical interpretation of audio visual texts and cinematic modes of expression.

Introduction to Drama and Theatre

The objective of this module is to enable learners to develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the study of drama on stage and screen, with particular reference to the drama and theatre of Ancient Greece, and to understandings of comic and tragic drama in modern contexts.

Irish Writing, 1960-1990

This module aims to give learners a clear sense of the key ideas, themes, and questions that have prevailed in Irish literature from mid-twentieth century to the end of the century, and to explore the established trends within Irish criticism regarding the production of modern Irish culture. It will cover themes and issues such as: language and nation; the role of men and women in Irish society and the politics of gender and sexuality; the representation of family and childhood in Ireland; the role of the Catholic Church in Irish life; literary production and censorship.

Media and Culture Seminar

This module aims to give learners a clear sense of the key ideas, themes, and questions that prevail with media and cultural discourses. The aims and objectives of this module are (i) to help learners understand how to read, interpret and understand key issues and topics within contemporary culture from media and cultural studies perspectives; (ii) to show learners the potential and possibilities of a humanities-based enquiry into media and culture discourses; and (iii) to give learners an appreciation for the value of dialogue and discussion in approach complex questions of contemporary significance within media and cultural studies.

Western Art Music of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries

This module examines Western Art Music of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Learners will encounter significant composers and their works indicative of a diversity of sub-genres including impressionism, the Second Viennese School and 1960s minimalism. The module situates this music within contemporaneous stylistic, cultural and political contexts in Europe and the USA.

World Music

This module explores World Music not only as folk, traditional or national musical art, but also as a form of self and group actualization, cultural capital and iteration, identity and alterity. This instils in learners a perspective of music as facilitating communication and understanding between and within sociological and ethnic groups.

Year 2

Semester 1

Critical Approaches to Literature

This module aims to provide learners with the knowledge, skills and competencies to identify, differentiate and evaluate a number of different critical and theoretical approaches to literary texts, the theoretical origin of these critical approaches, how to use these approaches in the evaluation and interpretation of literature, and how these critical approaches might be applied to literature in English and to other cultural forms.

Community Arts Theory & Practice (Semester 1)

This module aims to explore the community arts from a theoretical perspective in the first semester; provide a deep understanding of the rationale, the issues involved and the processes used; allow learners to engage practically and experientially in the following arts modalities: visual arts, drama and music; give learners hands on experience of the practice of the processes. In the second semester the learners move to an implementation phase where the theory and practice gained in semester one is put into real-time practice through placements with community groups and or the education programme in Visual.

Cultivating a Sociological Imagination

The overall aims of this module are to introduce learners to key theories in Sociology and the importance of developing a Sociological Imagination. This involves learners becoming familiar with the foundations of sociology (theories, processes, and structures), its key concepts, and their application to the study of social institutions and social divisions. A sociological imagination will enhance creative thinking and apply critical analyses of complex contemporary issues relevant to human existence.

Documentary across the Media

This module examines the language of documentary across media such as photography, the moving image, radio, podcasts to archive material for conceptual poetry projects. Using historical examples, the module will examine reflexive and experimental characteristics evident in documentary practices such as found footage to the film essay.

Popular Music and Culture General Ethics: Guiding Rules (Elective)

This module aims to introduce learners to the principles, concepts and problems of rule based ethical theories through a critical analysis of Kantian and Utilitarian moral theory. It will present learners with fundamental frameworks by which to analyse social, moral and political phenomena, as well as developing learner capacity for critical thinking.

Creative Writing: Poetry (Elective)

This module aims to develop in learners the skillset required to analyse and appreciate the achievements of contemporary poets. More importantly, the module challenges its participants to demonstrate their belief in the art by devoting time and resources to acquiring the techniques and skills required to produce their own original body of work. In doing this, the course aims to contribute to the continuing tradition of English language poetry in Ireland.

Romantic Poetry (Elective)

This module will deepen the learners’ capacity to identify characteristic features of romantic poetry. Learners will be able to identify and describe the signal characteristics of the Romantic artwork, and trace the Romantic strain in western culture thereafter. Critical thinking and writing skills will be progressed through exposure to a range of perspectives on the Romantic movement and its writings.

Theatre of the European Renaissance (Elective)

The objective of this module is to help learners to develop an in-depth understanding of drama and theatre in the period of the European Renaissance, with particular reference to the development of the theatre in England, and to the plays of William Shakespeare.

Semester 2

Media Arts

This module introduces learners to the variety of ways artists use technology to engage with the world we live in. The module explores how artists used video to make work in the 1960s as a critical response to the culture of commercial television. Learners will also examine the ways artist make work about the digital world and the web. This module looks at how artists approach ideas about connection, interaction, presence and absence and the bigger questions of our place in the universe.

Television and the Everyday

This module gives a theoretical structure to student learning in the area of cultural research on the Everyday. Building on this theoretical foundation students will explore interpretative strategies developed with regard to television. These interpretative strategies engage with the genres specific to television and with its dominant role as a form of mass broadcasting.

Contemporary Irish Writing

Learners on this module examine a selection of Irish novels and short stories written or published (approximately) in the last twenty years. The module aims to equip learners to consider and analyse how recent Irish writing has represented and interrogated certain key cultural, socio-economic and political transformations in Ireland’s recent history, including: the effects of globalisation; Irish Immigration/Emigration and its consequences; the politics of sexuality and gender; ecology, suburbanisation and the ghost estate; the rise and fall of the Celtic Tiger.

Community Arts Theory & Practice (Semester 2)

This module aims to explore the community arts from a theoretical perspective in the first semester; provide a deep understanding of the rationale, the issues involved and the processes used; allow learners to engage practically and experientially in the following arts modalities: visual arts, drama and music; give learners hands on experience of the practice of the processes. In the second semester the learners move to an implementation phase where the theory and practice gained in semester one is put into real-time practice through placements with community groups and or the education programme in Visual.

American Literature 1 (Elective)

This module aims to develop an understanding of the relationship between American literature and the politico-economic, social, religious, and (indigenous and transatlantic) intellectual and literary contexts governing its production. The module also aims to introduce learners to a variety of critical responses to the texts under discussion, and thereby develop awareness of advanced scholarship in American literary studies.

Drama and Performance 1 (Elective)

This module takes as its premise that the play text is merely a blueprint for the living art form of theatre. The module aims to introduce the principles and practice of drama and performance. Starting with basic technical exercises, it will increase the learners’ confidence and skill base in dramatic performance while at the same time giving an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of drama as a performance art.

General Ethics: The Good Life (Elective)

This module introduces learners to fundamental moral theories that underpin western political theory and concepts of the well lived human life. It presents learners with the principles and arguments of these theories and develops skills of analysis and theoretical critique. This module contributes to the development of ethical awareness and the skills of critical reflection, analysis and evaluation especially important within the context of contemporary digital media landscapes.

Year 3

Semester 1

Media and Communications

This module explores the relation between Communication and how meaning is produced and operates in a mediated society. The module will introduce learners to communication models and theories of both interpersonal and intercultural communication. Learners will examine how our identities are formed as individuals and as groups. Learners will be introduced to the major theories of mediated communication and examine the implications for democracy of mass media technologies and communications networks in contemporary society.

Digital Storytelling

This module aims to provide a blend of theory and practice in digital storytelling in the 21st century so as to deepen their understanding of the relationship between technology and storytelling. Learners will explore how digital technology is used to tell stories and will analyse the cultural, media, political and social impacts of digital storytelling. As part of the interdisciplinary skills and practices stream, learners will also create and curate their own digital storytelling projects.

Music and Visual Cultures

This module introduces the functions and application of music for screen. A historical and theoretical discussion of indicative case studies since the 1960s equips learners with the tools to investigate the aesthetics and semiotics of music for screen. Learners will also encounter developments in interactive audio for game and artistic digital composition. The module enables learners to apply critical listening skills to visual media, building on the learning outcomes of cinematic and televisual modules in earlier stages of the programme.

American Literature 2 (Elective)

The module aims to chart the development of US literature through seminal novels and poems and the evolution of these forms through periods of literary modernism, post-World War Two writing and postmodernism. It aims to understand how texts engaged with key historical contexts and political movements, including the Civil Rights movement, the series of US wars in Europe, Vietnam and the Middle East, post-war counter cultural movements, the proliferation of neoliberal capitalism and its attendant cultural effects.

Introduction to Curating Creative Events (Elective)

This module introduces learners to the world of creative events and the work that curators do. It looks at the research methods curators use to develop and manage exhibitions and events across different areas such as visual arts, theatre, music, dance, film, the spoken word and literary events. Learners will gain practical knowledge of what is involved in developing an idea for an exhibition, booking a theatre show or commissioning new work. Learners will learn how this happens in Visual and The George Bernard Shaw Theatre and will gain invaluable hands-on experience in this area.

Critical Theory 1: The Frankfurt School (Elective)

This module introduces learners to Critical Theory as it was developed by the Frankfurt School. It examines the method of philosophy and the critiques of society and capitalism as developed in the writings of the main participants of this school. This module builds on learner knowledge of the role played by media and culture in society. This module introduces the student to a school of philosophy integral to media and communications studies. It develops learners’ critical skills and social awareness.

Drama and Performance 2 (Elective)

Building on the foundation of Drama and Performance 1, it is intended to bring learners to the point where they have the understanding, skills and confidence to perform with competence in public. Starting with basic technical exercises, it will increase the learners’ confidence and skill base in dramatic performance while at the same time giving an understanding of the historical and theoretical underpinnings of drama as a performance art.

Existentialism: Philosophy & Literature (Elective)

The aim of the module is to survey canonical philosophers and texts of twentieth-century existentialism and its major precursors. The module traces Existentialist themes (such as authenticity, freedom, anxiety, death) in later twentieth-century works of philosophy and literature. The objectives of the module are to acquire knowledge of the range of Existentialist-inflected thought in philosophy and literature; to foster an ability to synthesise the study of this key movement in continental philosophical and literary culture in an interdisciplinary way; and to learn how to identify existentialist themes in philosophy, literature and modern culture.

Gothic Fiction (Elective)

The aim of this elective module is to provide knowledge and understanding of the history of Gothic literature and its related forms, including horror, and to account for more contemporary varieties found in urban fantasy, paranormal romance and dark fantasy.

Literature and Revolution in Ireland 1890-1937 (Elective)

This module traces the development of political, social and literary affairs in Ireland in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It aims to develop in learners a critically-informed and imaginative response to the study of Irish affairs in this period, as well as an understanding of the complex inter-relations between literature and politics that existed in these years.

Politics of Irish Literature 1798-1898 (Elective)

This module aims to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the analysis of nineteenth century Irish writing in English. It focuses on the complex inter-relations between literature, politics, and society that existed in the period, with particular reference to the literature of the Great Irish Famine.

Semester 2

Understanding Social Media

This module helps develop a historical and theoretical understanding of new media and social media. Learners will develop theoretical knowledge of how meaning is produced and negotiated through social media platforms and user generated content. By examining case studies learners are facilitated to understand the complex and often contradictory possibilities evident in this area such as digital participation, digital ethics, digital safety and artificial intelligence.

Women Make Music

This module first examines the intersection of gender, music making and musical participation in society. Case studies elucidate the impact of prominent women in classical, jazz and popular genres. Literature is covered that examines historical and contemporary gender issues in classical music; race and gender reflected in the music of women jazz musicians; and women and feminism in popular genres. Figures discussed in module range from Clara Schumann and Nadia Boulanger to Bessie Smith and Nina Simone, to Joni Mitchell and Beyoncé.

Research Methods

This module is a key mandatory module at Stage 3 that prepares students in the research, resourcing and planning of a dissertation or large creative project at Stage 4. This module prepares learners to think in terms of evidence-based practice by involving them in relevant, contemporary approaches to research, and by providing them with the tools to evaluate their own practice. It also develops in learners the key skills and competencies that enable the achievement of the programme learning outcomes.

Cyberpsychology (Elective)

The primary objective of the cyberpsychology module is to introduce learners to the key concepts, theories, research methodologies and practical applications of cyberpsychology. This module further aims to provide the learner with an understanding of the eight dimensions of cyberpsychology architecture (identity, social, interactive, text, sensory, temporal, reality and physical). This is a model that can be used as a framework to assess the psychological effect of any digital environment and experience

Creative Writing: Advanced Poetry (Elective)

This module aims to develop practitioners of, and advocates for, the ancient art of poetry. This module aims to train learners to recognise and evaluate the characteristics of great or strong poetry through exposure to, and critical meditation upon, fine examples drawn from contemporary national and international practice. In the course learners will create a body of work that demonstrates, through modelling, a sophisticated understanding of the features of the art of poetry in our time.

Critical Theory 2: Language and Self (Elective)

This module aims to introduce learners to the key thinkers, concepts and ideas associated with French critical and cultural theory. It will investigate the significant influence this strand of critical theory has had on both media studies and literary criticism.

Musical Theatre from 1750s-the present (Elective)

In this module, learners are presented with a cultural analysis of primary works in musical theatre since 1750, with an emphasis on opera. The module centres on operatic works by Mozart, Verdi and Wagner before concentrating on the ballet of Tchaikovsky, melodrama of Schoenberg and the musicals of Lloyd Webber. Learners will become familiar with the components of musical theatre production including text, sound and staging that are combined to create the dramatic event.

Signs and Meaning in Cinema (Elective)

This module aims to give learners a comprehensive understanding of the cultural significance of cinema in the 20th century by exploring key developments in film history from the mid twentieth century to the present. The module develops learner skills in film analysis and strategies of interpretation specific to film as an audio visual medium. Learners will be introduced to approaches to cinematography, editing, mise-en-scène and the relationship between sound and image. Learners will concentrate on the following areas: realism, genre, national to transnational Cinemas, live action to animation.

Gender and Sexuality in Post 60s Irish Culture and Writing (Elective)

This module aims to challenge learners to investigate the assumptions of their culture around gender relations and to grasp the political significance of those assumptions. It will do this by asking them to analyse post-war Irish society from horizons provided by conceptual frameworks developed in Philosophy, Sociology, and critical theory. In this sense, this course aims to be transformative for the learner, as they are required to blend their personal and cultural horizons with new categories and the insights that they provide.

The Literature of the Troubles (Elective)

One aim of this module is to challenge learners to interrogate and assess their own attitudes to a major series of events in recent Irish history. This will be achieved by exposing them to a range of readings which offer up a variety of viewpoints, sometimes conflicting, in relation to ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland. In this way, learners are challenged to reformulate their positons, given new insights and information, and to integrate those into their own beliefs, values, ideas, and attitudes. As an instance of a new synthesis of information, ideas, and perspectives, learners will demonstrate a sustained reading of sophisticated artworks, like Seamus Heaney’s bog poems in North (1975) for example, by negotiating their way through competing and conflicting readings of those works.

Literature of the Victorian Age (Elective)

Ranging across the genres of fiction, poetry, drama, and criticism this module aims to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the analysis of Victorian literature which is founded on detailed understandings of important contemporary social and political developments, and key critical contexts and debates.

Modernism & Modernity (Elective)

This module aims to develop sophisticated readers of complex literature. It will achieve this objective by challenging learners to develop their ability to organise their thinking around complex literary works through the demonstration of sophisticated skills. These skills will include the capacity to synthesize the influence of economic and material arguments like those of Marx, with the psychoanalytic arguments of Freud, allied to a consideration of material conditions like the growth of urban centres and the spread of industrialization, in relation to modernist authors and their major works.

Year 4

Semester 1

Seminar & Dissertation / Creative Project

This module should enable the learner to develop conceptual and academic depth in research knowledge; and become competent in planning and undertaking research and in making recommendations for applying findings. The nature of a dissertation will vary between learners as some will focus on Media, English and others Music or Drama, and there will be variances in the theoretical and methodological approach(es) especially in terms of developing a creative project thesis. There is consistency in the structure and what is expected in the dissertation layout and chapter formats. Seminars, one-to-one supervision, library and online sources will assist learners in their research approach, practice and write-up.

Creativity and Social Media (Elective)

This module introduces learners to theories of creativity and the potential of social media mechanisms as they apply to community and non-profit organisations and/or further academic study. It focuses on the analysis, interpretation and affordance of contemporary social and political online phenomena, thereby enhancing the learner’s skills in supporting civic engagement and professional work in a twenty-first century context. The knowledge, skills and competencies accrued in this module prepare the learner for the online reality into which current political, social and cultural issues are facing. The learners will participate in ethically informed, peer-supported project work that produces a positive civic outcome in addition to its use as a training exercise.

Creative Writing: Fiction (Elective)

The module aims to introduce learners to different writing disciplines and styles and encourage them to experiment with them. It will also require them to develop their skills as critics through the close reading of other writers work and their own and fellow learners writing and texts.

Contemporary Cinema (Elective)

This module examines cultural representation in film within the contexts of different contemporary cinemas and their audiences. Exploring the interdisciplinary currents across the humanities we will look at production models, consumption and race, gender and sexuality, ecology and social justice. The module invites critical thinking about media practices foregrounding discussion on theoretical debates on cinema, exhibition practices and the moving image.

Literature and Revolution in Ireland 1890-1937 (Elective)

This module traces the development of political, social and literary affairs in Ireland in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. It aims to develop in learners a critically-informed and imaginative response to the study of Irish affairs in this period, as well as an understanding of the complex inter-relations between literature and politics that existed in these years.

Politics of Irish Literature 1798-1898 (Elective)

This module aims to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the analysis of nineteenth century Irish writing in English. It focuses on the complex inter-relations between literature, politics, and society that existed in the period, with particular reference to the literature of the Great Irish Famine.

Postmodern Literature (Elective)

The module aims to chart the formal features and recurrent themes of key postmodern texts, while also outlining the varieties of postmodern writing, including: early and late postmodern fiction, postmodern feminist fiction, postmodern (metaphysical) detective fiction, and postmodern metahistorical fiction. Learners will also examine what constitutes postmodernity - that is the social, economic, technological and media developments that have characterised the postmodern age, and the effects these developments have had on how the postmodern subject experiences reality.

Post-War British and American Poetry (Elective)

This course aims to enhance our learners’ reading and thinking skills. It asks them to judge the impact of a range of historical factors on the artistic achievements of significant poets in the British and American traditions in the post-war period. Another aim of the course is to develop the confidence of our learners and to prepare them for the higher reaches of post-graduate work. The course does this through challenging them to evaluate post-war poetry from a range of theoretical perspectives, and through the application of developed close reading skills.

Social Movements, Activism and Social Change (Elective)

The study of social movements and their significance with regard to models of citizen participation is a key issue in the consideration of civic engagement and social change. This module facilitates the development of an appreciation and understanding of the value of social movements, their specific dynamics and tactics.

Semester 2

Seminar & Dissertation / Creative Project

This module should enable the learner to develop conceptual and academic depth in research knowledge; and become competent in planning and undertaking research and in making recommendations for applying findings. The nature of a dissertation will vary between learners as some will focus on Media, English and others Music or Drama, and there will be variances in the theoretical and methodological approach(es) especially in terms of developing a creative project thesis. There is consistency in the structure and what is expected in the dissertation layout and chapter formats. Seminars, one-to-one supervision, library and online sources will assist learners in their research approach, practice and write-up.

Cyberpsychology (Elective)

The primary objective of the cyberpsychology module is to introduce learners to the key concepts, theories, research methodologies and practical applications of cyberpsychology. This module further aims to provide the learner with an understanding of the eight dimensions of cyberpsychology architecture (identity, social, interactive, text, sensory, temporal, reality and physical). This is a model that can be used as a framework to assess the psychological effect of any digital environment and experience.

Gender and Sexuality in Post 60s Irish Culture and Writing (Elective)

This module aims to challenge learners to investigate the assumptions of their culture around gender relations and to grasp the political significance of those assumptions. It will do this by asking them to analyse post-war Irish society from horizons provided by conceptual frameworks developed in Philosophy, Sociology, and critical theory. In this sense, this course aims to be transformative for the learner, as they are required to blend their personal and cultural horizons with new categories and the insights that they provide.

The Literature of the Troubles (Elective)

One aim of this module is to challenge learners to interrogate and assess their own attitudes to a major series of events in recent Irish history. This will be achieved by exposing them to a range of readings which offer up a variety of viewpoints, sometimes conflicting, in relation to ‘the Troubles’ in Northern Ireland. In this way, learners are challenged to reformulate their positons, given new insights and information, and to integrate those into their own beliefs, values, ideas, and attitudes. As an instance of a new synthesis of information, ideas, and perspectives, learners will demonstrate a sustained reading of sophisticated artworks, like Seamus Heaney’s bog poems in North (1975) for example, by negotiating their way through competing and conflicting readings of those works.

Media Archaeology and The Digital Landscape (Elective)

The module provides a platform for learners to engage with media archaeology as a methodological approach to the study of media. Learners will examine key texts in this new field of media studies exploring new and emerging digital media though the historical layers of past and obsolescent medias. This allows learners to make connections across a number of modules that they have taken in media and culture, deepening their knowledge of media theories and philosophy.

Modern Drama in Performance (Elective)

Building on the knowledge of drama and theatre that learners gained at earlier stages of the programme, the objective of this module is to help learners develop a critically-informed and imaginative approach to the study of a number of key works of modern drama, as well as an in-depth understanding of some of the important features and characteristics of modern dramatic performance.

Musical Theatre from 1750s-the present (Elective)

In this module, learners are presented with a cultural analysis of primary works in musical theatre since 1750, with an emphasis on opera. The module centres on operatic works by Mozart, Verdi and Wagner before concentrating on the ballet of Tchaikovsky, melodrama of Schoenberg and the musicals of Lloyd Webber. Learners will become familiar with the components of musical theatre production including text, sound and staging that are combined to create the dramatic event.

Philosophy, Society and Literature (Elective)

This Module is an interdisciplinary module that explores how the material conditions of the human living condition impact on the philosophical, social and literary view of the life of the modern individual and how that is expressed through these forms. It explores how these new conceptions manifested themselves through the new and emerging mass media of the ‘panoramic Literature’ of the age. The module is designed to demonstrate how sociological changes in the material conditions of human beings manifest themselves in the literature and mass media of the times. It engages with philosophical, sociological and literary expressions of the emergence of modern urban living at the dawn of the Metropolis.

Postcolonial Writing (Elective)

This module has two principal aims: (1) to allow learners to read key texts from Africa, the Caribbean and South-east Asia and (2) to equip learners with critical skills and advanced knowledge and understanding of theory pertinent to postcolonial writing. Learners are encouraged to think about questions of identity, race and culture, the construction of gender in a colonial context, and the relationship between literature/cultural production and empire. A key objective of the module is to enable learners to become adept at handling key terms and concepts of postcolonial writing and theory.

Graduates can find employment in:

 

  • Media
  • Journalism and multiplatform writing
  • Publishing
  • Radio
  • Research
  • Television
  • Broadcasting
  • Creative arts
  • Teaching
  • Civil Service
  • Advertising
  • Public Relations

 

 

Further Study Opportunities

On successful completion of this programme students will be eligible to apply for Masters courses including the Professional Masters of Education courses to teach English at second Level.

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